Word Choice: Manner vs. Manor

Word Choice Manner vs. Manor

The words “manner” and “manor” sound the same, so it is easy to confuse them in writing. To avoid errors, though, simply follow the tips below.

Manner (How Something Is Done)

“Manner” is a noun and a synonym of “way,” meaning “how something is done.” As such, it refers to how something is achieved or carried out.

For example, we might use it in the following sentences:

She looked at the prince in a flirtatious manner.

The manner of his abdication caused much uproar.

It can also describe the attitude or behavior of someone or something:

His pretentious manner was off-putting for many.

The plural form of this term is “manners,” which most often refers to social behavior (i.e., how people behave while around other people):

Some people have no manners.

Jemimah’s father taught her good manners.

So while there can be a difference between the singular “manner” and the plural “manners,” both terms refer to human behavior.

Manor (A Large House with Land)

“Manor” is a noun that describes a large house or mansion and/or the land belonging to it. To use this term in a sentence, we might say something like:

The manor had belonged to the Cruwys family for generations.

The eighteenth-century manor was open to visitors.

The plural form of “manor” is “manors.” For example:

He liked to visit both tiny cottages and huge manors.

In UK slang, “manor” can also refer to an area over which someone exercises power or responsibility, typically in relation to crime or policing:

The police officer patrolled his manor.

In all cases, the word “manor” refers to a building or area of land.

Summary: Manner or Manor?

When using the words “manner” and “manor” in your writing, remember that:

  • Manner refers to how something is done or a person’s attitude. As a plural, though, the word “manners” typically refers to socially correct behavior.
  • A manor is a large house or mansion with land belonging to it.

Some people use the phrase “Living in a manor does not give you manners” to remember this distinction. But if you’re still unsure about this word, or you would simply like an expert to help with your spelling, we’re here to help.

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