AMA Referencing
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AMA Referencing Proofreading and Editing

Introducing AMA Referencing

The AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors was developed by the American Medical Association for use in their own publications, but it is now used by medical publishers and academics around the world. And if you’ve been asked to use “AMA referencing,” you’ll need the citation style set out in this guide.

This system is set out in the 11th edition of the AMA Manual of Style. But if you don’t have access to the full volume, our guide here should explain the basics.

AMA Referencing Proofreading Services

Our proofreading experts have in-depth knowledge of AMA referencing. So if you have a document that uses AMA citations or other elements of AMA style, you can trust us to check it for errors.

How To Select AMA Referencing

When you upload an academic document to our system, we’ll ask you to select a referencing style. So if you’re using AMA, just pick “AMA” from this list.

Selecting Harvard Referencing For Proofreading

And if you have further instructions for your editor (e.g., a specific edition of AMA you would prefer us to use), just add them here in the comment box.

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In-Text Citations In AMA Referencing

AMA is a number–endnote system (also known as “Vancouver” style). This means:

  • You cite sources with numbers in the text, usually at the end of a sentence
  • Citation numbers point to entries in a reference list
  • Sources are numbered in the order you first cite them

AMA referencing does this with superscript numbers, like this:

In-Text Citations In AMA Referencing

Here, for instance, the superscript “1” shows that we’re citing the first source in the reference list. To cite the same source again, we’d simply use the same number. The main variations on this citation style include:

  • Adding a page number in brackets after a citation number
  • Citing multiple sources in one place (with either a hyphen for consecutive sources or an unspaced comma between numbers for non-consecutive sources)

You can see examples of both of these below:

Variations On In-Text Citations In AMA Referencing

For instance, the “2” at the end of the first sentence above is a citation for page 34 of the second source in the reference list. The citation at the end of the passage, meanwhile, is for the first, third, fourth, and fifth sources in the reference list.

Creating AMA Reference Lists

As mentioned above, in AMA referencing, you list every source you cite in a “reference list” at the end of the document. This is where you provide publication information for cited sources, allowing your readers to find the texts you’ve used in your research. The rules for creating an AMA reference list include:

  • List all sources in the order they are first cited in the document
  • List authors surname first, followed by an initial with no period
  • For sources with more than six authors, include the names of the first three followed by the Latin term “et al.”
  • Do not list any source more than once
  • Italicize titles of books, journals, government bulletins, and pamphlets; do not italicize titles of other sources
  • Capitalize the first letter of each major word in book, journal, government bulletin, and pamphlet titles; for other sources, capitalize only the first letter of the first word, proper names, and abbreviations that are ordinarily capitalized
  • Use the NLM’s abbreviated titles for journals
  • Cite unpublished sources (e.g., letters or emails) parenthetically in the text and do not add them to the reference list

The exact reference format for each source will depend on the source type. You can see example references for a book, a website, and a print journal article below:

AMA Reference List Formats

You can find out more about AMA reference formats in the AMA Manual of Style.

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Other Referencing Styles

Not using Vancouver referencing? Not a problem! We also know the following:

Harvard • APA • OSCOLA • MLA

IEEE • Chicago • MHRA • Vancouver

Oxford • AGLCTurabian

And if you’re using a system we haven’t listed here, just leave us a comment when you upload your document. For more information on referencing, see here.